Population: Pregnancy through Early Childhood (Birth-Age 4)

Population Target:
Low-income pregnant woman and families with children birth to age 3
Early Head Start is a comprehensive program that focuses on child development and promoting strong families. Services are provided weekly either in the home or center, or as a combination of home-center based delivery. Socialization activities are also provided monthly for families. The program is offered in all states and has its headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EPB - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Population Target:
Teenagers pregnant with their first child and plan on keeping their child.
Nurse home visitors provide services to pregnant teenagers to encourage healthy behaviors during and post-pregnancy, promote parenting skills, and foster positive mother-child interactions. Visits also focus on family planning, learning life skills, and improving social competence. Home visitors serve mothers through the second half of their pregnancy and during the child’s first year of life. This program was implemented in San Bernardino County of California as a demonstration project by the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Nursing and the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health.
Health Access Nurturing Development Services (HANDS) Program
http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/document.aspx?rid=1&sid=37&mid=1
Population Target:
First-time parents at-risk for two or more factors, such as single parenthood, low-income, and substance abuse. May begin program during pregnancy and up to three months post child’s birth.
This program focuses on providing high-risk families with depression screenings for children and parents, providing health prevention, promoting positive child development, encouraging strong relationships, and supporting the families to become self-sufficient. Home visits utilize the “Growing Great Kids” curriculum and may be more or less frequent, depending on the needs of the family. Registered nurses or social workers also make home visits every three months to help with signs of labor, overview home safety, and family health. HANDS is implemented across the state of Kentucky.
Healthy Start- Home Visiting
http://www.healthystartassoc.org/
Population Target:
Families at-risk for low-income, limited education, disability, and lack of community resources
Healthy Start aims to support community services and services to families to provide health education and support, especially during the perinatal period and offer depression screenings and referrals. The frequency and duration of services depend on the severity of the case, though services may be provided up to two years after giving birth. The national office is located in Washington, D.C. and programs are offered in 36 states and in Puerto Rico.
Maternal Infant Health Outreach Worker (MIHOW)
http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/document.aspx?rid=1&sid=35&mid=1
Population Target:
Pregnant mothers and families with children birth to age 3 and may be low-income and live in rural areas.
MIHOW provides support groups and monthly home visiting services that provide parent education, promotion of positive parent-child relationships, and screenings on health and development. Services are provided by paraprofessionals in four states. The program’s headquarters are located at the Vanderbilt University Center for Health Services.
Nurse-Family Partnership
http://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/
Population Target:
Targeted: Low income, first-time parents
This program is committed to producing enduring improvements in the health and well being of low-income, first-time parents and their children by helping communities implement and sustain an evidence-based public health program of home visiting by registered nurses. Nurse-Family Partnership is a rigorously tested maternal and early childhood health program of its kind. Randomized, controlled trials conducted over 30 years demonstrate multi-generational outcomes that benefit society economically and reduce long-term social service expenditures. Nurse-Family Partnership is headquartered in Denver, Colorado and serves 32 states.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP-http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Resource Mothers Program
Population Target:
At-risk, pregnant teenagers
This program provides their services starting during pregnancy through the child’s first year of life. Services include visits to the hospital and the home to provide education and enhance the mother’s and child’s health, development, and social skills. This program has been implemented in six states and does not currently have a national office.

Population: Pregnancy through Childhood

Population Target:
Pregnant woman and families with children birth to age 6; Children may have emotional, behavioral, or developmental problems or the families have multiple risks, such as child abuse and poverty
Child FIRST bases its model on research that high-stress environments have negative implications on children’s brain development. The program conducts a needs assessment and observations of the families to help shape interventions suitable for the families. Interventions promote strong parent-child relationships and offer parent guidance. Home visitors also work along with parents to outline intervention, support, and community-based services applicable to the families. The Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut implements Child FIRST.
Population Target:
High risk families: single parenthood, low-income, domestic violence, substance abuse, and mental health issues.
HFA aims to build strong, healthy new parent families while creating relationships between paraprofessional home visitors and families that are culturally sensitive, strengths based, and family-centered. Additional program activities include parent support and father involvement groups. Research has shown positive outcomes in reducing child maltreatment, promoting self-sufficiency, and healthy child development. Their national office is located in Chicago, Illinois and currently serves 13 states.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Parents as Teachers (PAT)
http://www.parentsasteachers.org/
Population Target:
Families of children with special needs, at risk for child abuse, first-time parents, and issues with mental health.
This evidence-based program educates parents on child development, provides screenings for early health concerns, promote safe homes, and endorses school readiness and success. Home visits are typically monthly, but may be more frequent or decreased depending on the families’ circumstances. Group meetings and networking for families are also important components of the program. PAT has its national office in St. Louis, Missouri and serves 33 states and six countries.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Population Target:
Families at risk for child maltreatment, issues with mental health and disabilities, substance abuse, and parents recently released from incarceration.
Based on the main components of Project 12-Ways, SafeCare is an evidence-based model that aims to enhance parenting skills in areas of play, responses to behavior, and health and home safety. The weekly or bi-weekly home visits by paraprofessionals also aim to reduce child abuse in families with history or risk of maltreatment. The National SafeCare Training and Research Center is based at Georgia State University with programs located in 12 states. Services are planned for the United Kingdom.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx

Population: Early Childhood (Birth-Age 4)

Population Target:
Universal: Families with children birth to age 3 participating in any health clinic/center
In this program, professionals visit families in the home and educate them on the services available to them in the community regarding health and child development. Additionally, they promote positive health practices within the family and address parents’ concerns regarding their child’s physical, emotional, and intellectual development. Headquarters and training on the model is located at the Boston University. Currently, 19 states have implemented the program.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP)
http://www.parent-child.org/
Population Target:
Presence of multiple risk factors, such as low-income, isolation, and teen parenthood
This program, operating for over 40 years, has been validated as an effective program for families that lack economic and educational opportunities. Bi-weekly home visits made by paraprofessionals focus on promoting positive parenting, increasing quality and quantity of parent-child interaction, enhancing children’s conceptual and socio-emotional development, and developing children’s early literacy skills as well as promoting school readiness. The national office is located in New York. Services reach 14 states and three international sites.
Resources, Education, and Care in the Home (REACH)
http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/document.aspx?rid=1&sid=41&mid=1&oid=2
Population Target:
At-risk families, such as low-income adolescent mothers with infants, mothers with inadequate prenatal and perinatal care, and families with psychological issues.
REACH was a program created by the University of Illinois at Chicago and in collaboration of other state-level and local organizations as an effort to prevent death of infants in at-risk communities in Chicago. Registered nurses and community health advocates visited homes when the child reached the ages of 2 weeks, 6 to 8 weeks, 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months. The first visit entailed a psychological and health examination of the mother and developmental and health assessment of the child. In-between visits focused on keeping data on the child’s development and health status. If family needs deemed very severe and needed more intervention, extra visits were scheduled. Home visitors also linked mothers to social service organizations and offered them counseling services. This program was implemented in six Chicago communities.

Population: Childhood

Population Target:
At-risk families with children birth to age 5
Early Start is a home visiting intensive program implemented in New Zealand to promote the health, well being, and positive relationships of all members of at-risk families. There are four levels of home visit intensity, which the levels decrease in the length of time spent visiting the home during a week or month. Level service intensity is determined on the basis of the families’ needs. Home visiting services are provided to families living in the Christchurch area of New Zealand.
Population Target:
Low-income families with children birth to age 7 and parents that are eligible for services under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act
Administered by the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education with the U. S. Department of Education, this program aims to enhance adult literacy, parenting skills, early child education, and parent involvement in their children’s education. These goals are attained by providing the targeted population with home visits. The resources used to guide these visits may be modeled after the curriculum used in the Parents as Teachers program. Even Start has been implemented in all US states, Washington, DC, and at a few international sites.
Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY)
http://www.hippyusa.org/
Population Target:
Universal: For any parent(s) of children (age 3 to 5) that lacks confidence in preparing their child for school
HIPPY is dedicated to building parents’ confidence and training them to be their children’s first teacher. This program is effective in long-term academic success in children, increasing parent’s relationship with their children and involvement in school and communities. The national office is located in Arkansas. Services are provided by paraprofessionals across 22 states and in the District of Columbia
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Population Target:
Universal: For families with children under age 5 that seek out the program
Home Start provides support for families experiencing and coping with crises, so that the problems may decrease or be eradicated as quickly as possible. Services are provided through weekly, 2-3 hour home visits, and may include emotional support, parent education, and financial planning. The program may also organize support groups and social functions if that fits the needs of their clients. Families can receive assistance until their youngest child enters school or turns 5. The program’s headquarters is located in the United Kingdom and serves communities throughout the UK as well as in over 20 countries.

Population: Birth through Adolescence

Early Intervention Program for Adolescent Mothers (EIP)
http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/document.aspx?rid=3&sid=39&mid=1
Population Target:
Targeted: Pregnant minority adolescents (within 26 weeks gestation) referred to the county health department for public health nursing care
The goal of EIP is to enhance pregnant adolescent mothers’ health behaviors, improve birth outcomes, promote maternal caretaking skills, and support positive mother-child interaction. The program also addresses increasing the social competence, educational success, and repeat pregnancy. During its implementation, a maximum of 17 home visits were provided by public health nurses from mid-pregnancy through the end of the child’s first year, and four motherhood classes were also made available. This program was designed by the University of California at Los Angeles School of Nursing and the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health, Division of Community Health Services and implemented by the creators in a county in California.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EPB - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Population Target:
High risk families
Family Check-Up is a model that focuses on preventative and treatment services. The University of Oregon’s Child and Family Center provides training in this model. In this program, paraprofessionals use brief, comprehensive assessment to improve family management, enhance parenting skills and encourage parent involvement, improve maternal depression. The model also focuses on improving child behavior, academic success, and internalizing problems.
Notes:
Met the Department of Health and Human Services criteria for evidence-based early childhood home visiting programs (2010) EBP - http://homvee.acf.hhs.gov/programs.aspx
Population Target:
Families with children birth to age 18 and exhibit at least 2 risk factors, one being neglect.
The main goals of this program are to decrease risk factors while promoting protective factors for parents, children, and within the family. Strongest emphasis is placed on increasing the well-being, including school readiness and involvement, and safety of children. Services include family assessment, home visits, goal setting, and supportive and interactive family activities. Family Connections programs from the replication project provided services to families for at least an hour per week for up to three years. The program was first created and implemented by the University of Maryland in Baltimore and then implemented in eight other communities across the US.
Population Target:
At-risk for placement in state-funded care
This 4 to 6 week, intensive intervention program provides 24 hours services within the home to prevent out-of-home placement of children, build family relationship, and offer support in the reunification process. The home visitor uses research-based interventions, such as cognitive/behavioral therapy, crisis intervention, parent education, and skill building in order to prevent future problems. This program is implemented and has its headquarters in Washington state.
Nurturing Parenting Programs
http://nurturingparenting.com/
Population Target:
At-risk families for abuse and neglect with children birth to age 18
These prevention and intervention programs are designed to encourage positive, nurturing parenting within at-risk families. There are several adaptations of this model, which differ in the length of time and format (home visit, group program, or both) the services are provided. The programs are published by Family Development Resources, Inc., which is located in Asheville, North Carolina. Programs have been implemented in all the states and internationally.